Anointing of the Sick

Every first Friday of each month during the 8:30 am Mass the Sacrament of the Sick is given. Wheel chairs are available in the church for anyone needing one. Following the Mass there is a Holy Hour. This Mass is held in the main church, so there are no stairs to be climbed. If your shut in is unable to come to church, please contact Kathy in the office and other arrangements can be made. Arrangements can also be made to bring Communion to your home if needed. Please contact the office for further information.

The Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick gives strength and support and can be administered to anyone struggling with an illness.

Who may Receive?

In the Catholic Church, Extreme Unction or the Last Rites is the anointing at the time of death. Since the Second Vatican Council, this sacrament is now called the Anointing of the Sick and has been broadened to offer healing and comfort in times of illness that may not lead to immediate death. Speaking about a wider implementation of this sacrament, Pope Paul VI advocated for “a wider availability of the sacrament and to extend it—within reasonable limits—even beyond cases of mortal illness.”

Unlike the traditional understanding of the Last Rites, the sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick is, ideally, to be administered in a communal celebration.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church states that when the sick are anointed they should be “assisted by their pastor and the whole ecclesial community, which is invited to surround the sick in a special way through their prayers and fraternal attention” (1516). “Like all the sacraments the Anointing of the Sick is a liturgical and communal celebration…It is very fitting to celebrate it within the Eucharist” (1517).

This sacrament of healing is available to the chronically ill, the elderly, those facing serious surgical procedures, and those in danger of death.  It is also administered, on an emergency basis, to those injured in serious accidents.  The rite of anointing of the sick is of ancient origin.  It involves prayers for healing and anointing with oil.  Arrangements for individual anointing are made with the pastor.